Author: Raphael Santos

Raphael Santos is a PPM enthusiast with expertise in providing Microsoft Project, Project Online, and Project Server solutions. He has worked in several projects to implement PPM tools, including projects located in Latin America (Brazil, Peru, and Argentina), in the United States, and in Africa. He is also a trainer with more than 10 years of experience teaching users how to use Project Management tools in a more productive way. In 2016, Raphael was awarded the MVP title by Microsoft in recognition of his contributions to the Project Management community. Raphael is a PPM Consultant at Sensei Project Solutions, a certified Microsoft partner specializing in project and portfolio management deployments. Sensei offers a complete set of services to help organizations succeed with their Microsoft PPM deployments. Services include full implementation and training as well as pre-configured solutions and report packs. Visit senseiprojectsolutions.com or contact info@senseiprojectsolutions.com for more information.

Custom Visual Reports for Multiple Project Schedules

Custom Visual Reports for Multiple Project Schedules

Microsoft offers two main cloud-based platforms that allow organizations and individuals to manage their portfolios, programs, and projects at an enterprise level. They are Project for the web and Project Online. While Project for the web provides simple, yet powerful work management capabilities for project managers and team members to collaborate in their initiatives, Project Online is a flexible solution that provides powerful project management capabilities for planning, prioritizing, and managing projects and project portfolio investments (you can learn more about these two platforms here). Although a large number of firms from different industries use either Project for the web or Project Online to support their project management initiatives, there is a significant number of organizations and individuals who are still using the standalone version of Microsoft Project to manage their schedules. One of the biggest struggles for these users is the fact that, contrary to what happens when using a cloud-based PPM platform, the standalone version of Microsoft Project does not offer a portfolio-level report that allows users to consolidate information about all their .mpp files in a single visualization. As a dashboard addict (you can confirm this here, here, and here 😊), I’ve tried to come up with a solution that would allow users of the standalone version of Microsoft Project to create a portfolio report for their projects. The Approach To make it happen, the following approach will take place: Step #1: Exporting the Data The first step is to export the schedule’s data into a Microsoft Access database. Use the process I linked to above in item #1 above to learn how to accomplish that. I like using the approach of naming the .mdb files with a standard prefix and suffix, so it is easier to manipulate the files in Power Query when transforming them. In the example below, I am creating a new Microsoft Access database from a project called ‘Advanced AI Database Technology.’ Note that I am appending to the name of the file the prefix, ‘Database-,’ and the suffix, ‘.mdb.’ Step #2: Obtaining and Transforming the Data With all the schedules exported, the second step is to use Microsoft Excel to retrieve them. In Excel, go to Data > Get Data > From File > From Folder. Browse to the folder where all the schedules have been placed, as shown below: In the next dialog, click Transform Data to initiate the process of manipulating the files. You are now transforming your data in Power Query. The very first action is to filter the files being retrieved, so that if there are files of different extensions other than the .mbd, they are left out of the query. I usually have a single folder that contains the schedules (.mpp files) and the databases (.mdb files) together, so that’s the reason I personally need to take this action. Next, we combine all the files. Power Query needs to be informed of the object(s) to be extracted for each file. Select the MSP_EpmTask table. At this point, the magic happens! Power Query will combine all the files based on common attributes from the extracted object. Now that the results are available and you have the combined data from all files, it is time to organize them. As not all the imported columns will be used to create the dashboard, it is best to remove the columns that aren’t required making the report lighter and more efficient. Use the Choose Columns command in Power Query to select the following: Moving forward, as this will be a portfolio dashboard, you will need data from a project-level perspective, but, as you might want to navigate to the schedule to see task-related information, you will also need task-level data. Because of that, rename the first query and call it ‘Tasks.’ You will then have to duplicate the ‘Tasks’ table and rename it to ‘Projects,’ as shown. It is important to make sure that the Projects table only has project-level information. To accomplish that, apply a filter by selecting the tasks with Id 0 in the TaskIntUID column. Following these steps will guarantee that you have all the required information to build the portfolio dashboard. If you are familiar to Power Query, you can create additional columns for your tables, such as calculated columns that will determine the status of projects and tasks, as well as KPIs and other attributes that are relevant to your organization. After all of this is finished, click Close & Land. Step #3: Creating the Dashboard With the data loaded into the spreadsheet, make sure that the Queries & Connections dialog is available. Right-click the Tasks query and select Load To… adding the query into the Data Model. In the Import Data dialog, select the options as highlighted below: Once this is completed for the Tasks table, repeat the same steps for the Projects table. This is important, so you will be able to create a relationship between the two tables. To do so, you will have to use Power Pivot (and this, then, justifies adding the tables to the Data Model 😊). From the Power Pivot tab, click Manage. From within Power Pivot and from the Home tab, click Diagram View. Create a new relationship between the two tables by using the Source.Name column (you can drag and drop the column from one table into the other). After the relationship between the tables is created, get started building the dashboard based on your organization’s needs. My preference is to create multiple Pivot Tables in auxiliary tabs within an Excel spreadsheet, and then use them to feed the main dashboard. When there are updates to your schedules, you can re-export the data into the Microsoft Access database, using the approach of replacing the existing .mdb files. Then, back in Excel, you can right-click a Pivot Table and refresh it, so the latest data will be obtained, and your portfolio dashboard will be updated. Happy reporting!

Visual Awesomeness: Enhance Your Project Online Power BI Reports with Custom Visuals

Visual Awesomeness: Enhance Your Project Online Power BI Reports with Custom Visuals

Project Management Institute (PMI)® Professional Development Units (PDUs):This Webinar is eligible for 0.75 PMI® PDUs in the Ways of Working category of the Talent Triangle. Event Description: Come and join us for a hands-on session where you’ll learn how to use custom visuals to take your PPM reports to the next level! During this presentation we will build a report with three visuals that can greatly improve the way Executives, PMO members, and Project Managers can see, evaluate, and interpreter their project, resource, and portfolio data; providing them with more accurate user-friendly information so they can make better decisions. Presenter Info: Raphael Santos is a PPM enthusiast with expertise in providing Microsoft Project, Project Online, and Project Server solutions. He has worked in several projects to implement PPM tools, including projects located in Latin America (Brazil, Peru, and Argentina), in the United States, and in Africa. He is also a trainer with more than 10 years of experience teaching users how to use Project Management tools in a more productive way. In 2016, Raphael was awarded the MVP title by Microsoft in recognition of his contributions to the Project Management community. Raphael is a PPM Consultant at Sensei Project Solutions, a certified Microsoft partner specializing in project and portfolio management deployments. Sensei offers a complete set of services to help organizations succeed with their Microsoft PPM deployments. Services include full implementation and training as well as pre-configured solutions and report packs. Visit senseiprojectsolutions.com or contact info@senseiprojectsolutions.com for more information.   Have you watched this webinar recording? Tell MPUG viewers what you think! [WPCR_INSERT]

Custom Visuals for Power BI

Custom Visuals for Power BI

Organizations that use Microsoft Project Online or Project for the web to manage their portfolio of projects often need to develop reports that can support Executives, PMO Members, Project Managers, and other key users in understanding how these projects – alongside with resources – are consolidated, and also how they are performing. To help users get up to speed, Microsoft has developed two Power BI Content Packs designed to be used with the PPM solution: an initial version designed to work with Project Online and a more recent version that reads Project for the web data. In a previous blog post, I shared an overview of the Power BI content pack for Project for the web. Although the content packs are very powerful at allowing organizations to see a complete view of their portfolio of projects and resources, there is always space for enhancements. My duties as a PPM consultant are a very good source of ideas for extending the out-of-the-box functionalities of the PPM platform and its components, as I am always working with customers that have different business requirements. In the following article, I’ll be sharing some examples on how to use Power BI’s custom visuals to extend the native reporting functionalities. What are Power BI custom visuals? Power BI comes with a collection of visuals that can be used to create powerful reports and dashboards. However, there are scenarios in which users might want to create a specific report where the native visuals do not support their needs –this is where custom visuals come into play. In Power BI, individual developers (or formal organizations) can create visuals that are not part of the out-of-the-box collection included in Power BI desktop. These custom visuals are stored in the appsource website, and can be incorporated into Power BI desktop to provide report authors with a wider range of possibilities for creating reports. As an example, the two content packs for the PPM solution provided by Microsoft use a custom visual called Gantt to demonstrate how the projects are spread over time, based on their start and finish dates. Custom Visual #1: Funnel with Source by MAQ Software If your organization has defined a structured governance process for using the PPM solution, you might have developed a workflow that supports the phases and stages that consolidate that process. In that sense, a common scenario for report authors is to create a report that displays how many projects are parked in each governance phase. If you happen to be using the native visuals available in Power BI, your report might look like this: However, there is a very nice custom visual available from the app source website. It’s called Funnel with Source by MAQ Software. This visual shows a funnel journey that allows users to follow the path of a given metric over various stages, which perfectly fits to the scenario we have for the governance workflow phases. After obtaining the visual from the appsource and applying it to our report, we could provide our users with a much more comprehensive visualization like this: Custom Visual #2: Decomposition Tree The second option I want to discuss isn’t necessarily a “custom” visual. The Decomposition Tree visual above lets users visualize data across multiple dimensions, by aggregating data and enabling the drilling into any order. At the time of this article’s publication, the Decomposition Tree visual is still in preview, which means that you must enable it from Power BI settings to be able to use the visual. To illustrate a scenario in which using the Decomposition Tree visual would cause a very positive impact, imagine an organization that needs to understand the demand for its resources. This organization might have created custom attributes to categorize resources by Department, Team, and Role, and might want to use those attributes to consolidate the current demand that comes from assignments. At the same time, they might want to be able to see the current assignments in more detail, drilling to the lowest level and understanding which projects certain resources are assigned to. If you are using out-of-the-box visuals, you could build something like this: Now, if you decide to use the Decomposition Tree visual, you’d provide users with the ability to pick what’s relevant to them, so they could expand the nodes and drill to the next levels based on their preference: Custom Visual #3: Card Browser In the past, I’ve worked with an organization that wanted to be able to consolidate their portfolio of projects by a few attributes (for example, by KPI, Department, and Project Type). Another requirement was to easily provide users with the ability to discover more information about a project without having to navigate back to the Project Web App site. In essence, the report’s audience was executives that didn’t want to spend time navigating back and forth between the workspace in Power BI and the Project Web App site, so all the relevant information about the projects should be available in a single page, and should also be easily discoverable. To resolve that, I used an interesting custom visual called Card Browser, which is a very powerful visual for storytelling, because it allows users to see summarized information in a front-page card, then flip the cards to reveal detailed information: Once the user clicks the card, all the detailed information for the selected project is displayed: Final Considerations Custom Visuals are an excellent extension of Power BI, allowing users to show their data in a way that makes sense to their organization’s needs. There are lots of different custom visuals available out there, so if you have a special requirement for your reports, go check them out! Watch my on-demand webinar, eligible for 0.75 PMI® PDU in the Technical category of the Talent Triangle, to learn more. It will be a hands-on session where you’ll learn how to use custom visuals to take your PPM reports to the next level! We will build a report with three visuals that can greatly improve the way Executives, PMO members, and Project Managers can see, evaluate, and interpret their project, resource, and portfolio data providing them with more accurate user-friendly information so they can make better decisions. This article originally appeared on Sensei Project Solution’s website.

FTE calculation in PPM

FTE calculation in PPM

What does the demand for resources look like in my organization? Working as a PPM consultant to support organizations from multiple sectors which have different business needs and requirements for their PPM deployments, brings lots of excitement and learning opportunities, while also being very challenging. I have recently worked with a customer that was just getting started with Project Online, and their number one priority was to be able to easily see the consolidated portfolio of resources, which would help the senior management to identify bottlenecks on their capacity and the overallocation of resources based on their demand. After delivering the initial set of reports which were consolidating resource capacity and demand management, I received another request: the senior management wanted to calculate the Full Time Equivalent (FTE) for resources, with the objective of knowing how many resources would be required every month throughout the year. According to the Government Accountability Office (GAO), the FTE represents “the total number of regular straight-time hours (i.e., not including overtime or holiday hours) worked by employees divided by the number of compensable hours applicable to the fiscal year”. The text also determines that, for the purposes of estimating FTEs, 2,080 hours would be equal to one FTE (40 hours x 52 weeks). The customer I was working with wanted to bring the calculation down to the lowest level, as we know that not every week throughout the year will have 5 business days (because of the federal holidays that will reduce the number of working hours) and not every month will be composed of 4 full weeks of work (because the number of working days within a month will vary based on the calendar). So they wanted to calculate the exact number of working days for each single month to be able to discover the number of needed FTEs each month. In addition to this requirement, my customer wasn’t using Resource Engagements, so all the calculation would be created considering assignments only. The data model The data model used in the report is shown below. Note that the ResourceTimephased dataset wouldn’t be required to calculate the FTE, since the calculation needs to use only assignments data and does not require the utilization of capacity. However, it was included in the report because my customer also wanted to compare capacity vs. demand and wanted to discover the remaining availability. Once the data was retrieved and all the relations were created, we could put together a simple report to compare capacity vs. assignments over time: FTE calculation If a very simplistic criteria could be used to calculate the FTE, we could create a formula that would take the total number of hours assigned to resources and divide its value by 168 (with 168 being the average number of hours an employee works a month: 8 hours per day * 21 days a month). The result would look like this: As I am using Power BI to mock this report up, the DAX expression used to calculate the FTE is: FTE = [AssignmentWork]/168 However, as per my initial considerations, we need to bring the calculation down to the lowest level, taking into consideration the exact number of working days each month to be able to determine the correct number of FTEs required each month. The initial step is to add to the data model a new table that determines the federal holidays for the year, so we can use this table to subtract the number of working days in a month that has a holiday. To keep it simple, we can create a new SharePoint list and enter all the holidays for 2019: Once the SharePoint list is created, we need to add it to the data model in Power BI. An important thing to note is that the Date column is formatted using the default ‘datetime’ format, which brings us inconsistent results such as 1/1/2019 8:00:00 AM and 5/27/2019 7:00:00 AM: As we will need to establish a relationship between the Date column from the US Holidays table with the TimeByDay column from the Timeset table, the column values on both tables need to be the same. The TimeByDay column uses the default ‘datetime’ format, always displaying the 12:00:00 AM suffix in conjunction with the date. Because of this, we need to transform the Date column in the US Holidays table to be formatted the same way, so we will be able to create the relationship. To do that, we can use the ‘Transform’ option in Power BI’s Power Query Editor. As a result, the Date column in the US Holidays table will look like this: Once the transformation is finished and the relationship between the tables US Holidays and Timeset is created, we will be able to build a more advanced set of formulas to calculate the FTE. Calculating the FTE based upon the number of working days To be able to calculate the exact number of FTEs as needed in this exercise, the first thing to do is to discover the number of working days in each month. To facilitate the understanding of the logic used to achieve this goal, I will create two new columns in my data model, under the Timeset table: The first column will be called ‘Is Working Day’, and will check if a date is a Sunday, a Saturday or a regular working day The second column will be called ‘Is Holiday’, and will check if a date is listed as a holiday in the US Holidays table The DAX expressions used to create the two columns are listed below: Is Working Day = IF(OR(WEEKDAY(Timeset[TimeByDay])=1,WEEKDAY(Timeset[TimeByDay])=7),”No”,”Yes”) Is Holiday = IF(RELATED(‘US Holidays'[Title])=””,”No”,”Yes”) Once the DAX expressions are created, we can build a third column in the data model that will calculate the number of working days using the two previous columns: Working Days = CALCULATE(COUNTA(Timeset[TimeByDay]), Timeset[Is Holiday]=”No”,Timeset[Is Working Day]=”Yes”) As a result, we can now count the exact number of working days in each month (please be aware that the holidays for 2020 were not included in the SharePoint list): Based on that, we can change the FTE formula to not use 168 as a fixed number that represents the average number of hours worked per month by an employee; instead, we can multiple the number of working days by 8 to discover the number of working hours by employee each month, and then use this value in conjunction with the total number of assigned hours. It is also important to mention that, if your organization does not consider 8 as the total number of hours a resource can dedicate to projects each day, you can replace this number by whatever is your standard number of daily hours dedicated to projects. The results in my scenario will look like this: To make things look more professional, there’s nothing better than building a very nice dashboard: As we are using Power BI, all visuals are responsive, allowing the senior management to focus on what’s relevant to them: Originally published here. Used with permission.

Custom Workflow Notifications in the PPM Platform

Custom Workflow Notifications in the PPM Platform

When using a PPM platform such as Project Online or Project Server to capture, prioritize, select, plan, and manage their initiatives, organizations have a huge opportunity to automate their business process by collecting information about all project ideas in one place and, and based on their internal process, take a logical decision of which initiatives will contribute the most with the strategic goals that has been defined. In this scenario, the creation of custom workflows is vital to help putting this process automation in place (if you want to know more about the creation of custom workflows in Project Online / Project Server, you can visit this link). When creating custom workflows for the customers I am engaged with, I am always looking for a way to provide them with a valuable experience, in a way that it is easy to find and understand the key information that will support their business decisions. And if there is one thing that I really think that needs to be configured in the workflows is the notification mechanism. Think about the following scenario: when a new project request is created, a business user usually needs to fill in a form with essential information about that request; then, once all the information is inserted, the request needs to be submitted for review/approval. And here is where we have a problem: the workflow’s out of the box configuration does not bring any useful information about the request that can be used by the reviewer/approver. Here is an example of a project request form that an organization might use:   When submitted for review/approval through the workflow process, this is the message that is shared with the reviewer/approver:   Let’s assume you are a reviewer/approver in this process: when you receive this message, there is nothing from it that you can use to understand what this request is all about. It means that, if you want to know more about the request, you must navigate to the Project Center page, find the request, open it, and check its Project Detail Pages. This represents lots of unneeded clicks, don’t you think? In this case, my preference is to configure the workflow notification to include all the vital information, so whoever needs to review/approve the request will be able to easily understand its objectives. I must admit that I am a huge fan of tables (and their power to better organize and structure data) – so rather than just including the fields in the notification area, I like to use tables to standardize the request information. However, we have an additional problem here. Unfortunately, SharePoint Designer (the software used to create workflows) does not have a functionality to create/design tables in its notification area. This is what blocks us from designing our custom notifications. The workaround is provided by an old friend: Microsoft Word. The idea is simple: we can create a new document and organize the notification the way we want it to be. Once ready, all we must do is copy and paste it to SharePoint Designer, including the project fields that will fill the notification. Here is an example:   Once the form is created and ready to go, it is just a matter of copying and pasting it into SharePoint Designer:   To finalize the configuration of our custom notification, we need to replace the blank spaces with the appropriate fields from Project Online:   Now, once a new project request is submitted, it will be easier for the reviewer/approver to understand what it is all about:

Real-world Reporting: Using Power Bi Visuals To Solve Business Requirements and Create Stellar Reports In Project Online

Project Management Institute (PMI)® Professional Development Units (PDUs): This Webinar is eligible for 1 PMI® PDUs in the Technical category of the Talent Triangle. Event Description: Microsoft has recently launched a very impressive update to its PPM Power BI Content Pack, which allows organizations to get started quickly with dashboards and reports without requiring any customizations in Project Online. The new Content Pack contains the latest visualizations and features available in Power BI, and it comes with 13 pages supporting portfolio, resource, and project reporting. Even though the released Content Pack represents a huge advance in the way companies are now able to report against their data, there is always space to take a step further. Based on my real-world experience working with customers to solve their business requirements and meet their strategic goals, during this session I will demonstrate how you can use 5 custom visuals that are not included in the out of the box Content Pack to create stunning reports. You’ll learn, through a combination of hands-on lab and practice, the business requirements and use cases for each of the 5 custom visuals – and will be able to take your PPM Content Pack to the next level. Presenter Info: Raphael Santos is a PPM enthusiast with expertise in providing Microsoft Project, Project Online, and Project Server solutions. He has worked in several projects to implement PPM tools, including projects located in Latin America (Brazil, Peru, and Argentina), in the United States, and in Africa. He is also a trainer with more than 10 years of experience teaching users how to use Project Management tools in a more productive way. In 2016, Raphael was awarded the MVP title by Microsoft in recognition of his contributions to the Project Management community. Raphael is a PPM Consultant at Sensei Project Solutions, a certified Microsoft partner specializing in project and portfolio management deployments. Sensei offers a complete set of services to help organizations succeed with their Microsoft PPM deployments. Services include full implementation and training as well as pre-configured solutions and report packs. Have you watched this webinar recording? Tell MPUG viewers what you think! [WPCR_INSERT]

Using Local Calendars in the PPM Platform

Using Local Calendars in the PPM Platform

Working as a PPM consultant offers me opportunities to interact with many different clients, all of which have diverse needs and requirements. A couple of weeks ago, I received a very interesting request from a company I am engaged with regarding the utilization of custom calendars by their project managers. Before we deep dive into their request, it is important to provide some background. By default, the PPM platform does not allow project managers to configure their own calendars when connected to PWA. The logic behind this restriction is straightforward. As we are using a platform to centralize and standardize our project management practices, it does not make sense for project managers to use projects elements that are not part of the global configuration. If you’ve ever tried to modify the default calendar or create a new calendar when connected to PWA, you may have noticed that the options were grayed out: Despite this, there are some unique scenarios in which more flexibility, in this case changing PWA’s configuration to allow certain things that were not planned, is required. Let’s go back to my client’s request. They are a large service provider company working in the metallurgical industry. Their work consists of machine revitalization, also known as retrofit. They have clients all over the United States, as well as in other countries in both Central and South America. In their project management process, as soon as new retrofit contract is signed, a new project is created on the PPM platform (in their case, Project Online). As their projects happen in diverse locations, it is common that schedules are developed which take into consideration particularities and restrictions imposed by clients. This includes things such as local holidays, plants temporarily closed for maintenance, unavailability of key staff members that are involved, and so on. With a scenario such as this, it is very hard to keep the administration of the company’s calendars as the Project Online admin’s responsibility. Even though it would be nice to keep the standards and ask the admin to create the calendars as requested by project managers, consider if this is a worth effort. The more likely reality is that calendars will be used exclusively for each project, which means that, in most of the cases, they will be useless for other projects. To allow project managers to create their own calendars based upon the requirements they have, as a PWA admin, navigate to PWA Settings. Under the Operational Policies section, click Additional Server Settings. Then, in the Enterprise Setting subsection, make sure to check the Allow projects to use local base calendars option. See figure 2. Click Save. Once this option is enabled, project managers will have the ability to create their own calendars: Managers will have the opportunity to create their calendars as a copy of an Enterprise calendar (this means they can take the advantage of including all the existing exceptions). They may also choose to create a new blank base calendar: For example, let’s say that the project will happen in Brazil, and we need to include the national holidays that are established for the country in the calendar. We would create a new base calendar and add the exceptions as needed: To wrap-up this post, let’s look at several other considerations: By changing these settings and allowing project managers to create their own calendars, they will have permission to create local calendars, but they will still not be allowed to modify anything in the Enterprise ones Local calendars are only available in the project in which they have been created Project managers won’t be able to add their local calendars to Enterprise, and if they try it, they will receive the following message: So, tell me about your experience working with calendars in the PPM platform. Have you ever needed to create local calendars for your projects? Feel free to reach out. Let’s chat. Related Content Webinars (watch for free now!): Task Planning using Microsoft Project What’s the value of Schedule Risk Analysis? Articles: Levels of Project Scheduling Proficiency Are You Using the Team Planner View Feature in Microsoft Project? Resource Leveling: Scheduling vs. Leveling

Custom Visual Reports for Project 2013 and 2016

Custom Visual Reports for Project 2013 and 2016

Every time a new version of Microsoft Project was launched, there were a mix of excitement and enthusiasm to discover, explore and understand the new features that were made available with the new software. Personally speaking, I remember the level of satisfaction I had when Microsoft Project 2013 was first released, because it finally had the long-time waited reporting engine with built-in graphical dashboard reports, in which project managers could view, print, export, edit or even create their own custom reports with life data from the schedule. That was something cool! All the built-in reports that came with (at that time) new Project 2013 were great, and with just a little more effort you could make them even better – so that’s the reason I started creating my own custom reports. Here I wanted to share a collection of 9 custom reports that I developed, which I use in my day-to-day duties as a project manager (below you will have a brief explanation for each one of them). You will also find a link to download a file that contains all the reports, so you can install them on your machine. Feel free to modify the reports as per your organization’s needs, and feel free to share them with your colleagues and co-workers.   1. Project Summary This report displays basic project information, helping project managers to have a quick overview of their project 2. Schedule Summary   This report can be used by project managers to understand the performance of their project when it comes to the schedule itself. It includes Baselines and Current Dates, alongside with Actual and Remaining durations and variances   3. Milestones   This report filters and displays all the milestones that are included in the schedule, allowing project managers to understand where there are variances 4. Critical Tasks   By using this report project managers can quickly identify all the critical tasks in their schedule 5. Schedule Overview   This report provides detailed information about the schedule, including Task Status, Tasks burn-down and Late Tasks 6. Cost Summary   This report helps project managers to understand how their project is performing in terms of costs 7. Work Summary   The objective of this report is to provide a detailed summary about the project’s work 8. Project Execution   This report will help project managers to analyze all the aspects of his/her projects in details 9. Resource Summary   With this report project managers can easily understand how their resources are being used in the project All the reports are configured to work with both Project 2013 and 2016, and they can also be added to the Enterprise Global in Project Server 2013, Project Server 2016 or Project Online. If you want to download the reports, you can use this link: TechNet Gallery – Custom Reports for Project 2013 and 2016 I hope you find it useful. I would love to hear your feedback! Related Content Webinars (watch for free now!): Report Basics: Build an Agile Kanban Board in Microsoft Project It’s All About… Reports! Articles: Create a Monthly Cash Flow Report in Microsoft Project 2013 Creating Milestone Reports in Microsoft Project Creating a Custom Report in Project 2013: This Week’s Tasks